Beginning proficiency level: 10th Grade Biology

Support materials:
Big Goals Document

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating: Two BP strands equal an overall BP rating.

Beginning

Advanced

Exemplary

Strand 1: The Big Goal’s appropriateness for all students, reasoned ambitiousness, and sources.

Adopts a broad, generic goal that aspires to be ambitious and feasible for the entire class and achieves that balance for at least half of the teacher’s students

Designs a goal that is both ambitious and feasible for most students, based on reasoning informed by multiple sources, including diagnostic results for mastery goals

Designs feasible, highly ambitious goals that require intense work from each and every student, based on reasoning informed by multiple sources, including diagnostic results for mastery goals

Strand 2: The teacher’s understanding of how accomplishing goals will demonstrate mastery of standards and increase students’ opportunities in life.

Describes how the goal is aligned to key standards and identifies a basic tool of measuring achievement of the goal.

Describes how the goal is aligned to all key standards, explains broadly what students should know, understand or be able to do in order to achieve the goal, and cites the necessary assessment tools (e.g. achievement tests, performance-based assessments, etc.) that will be most meaningful to students’ lives when measuring the different facets of the goal

Describes how the goal is aligned to all key standards, explains the specific and prioritized knowledge and skills that each student will need to master in order to reach the goal – including pre-requisites – and cites a specific set of balanced measurement tools to measure different facets of the goal that will be most meaningful to students’ lives

 

Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: BPStrand 1: The Big Goal’s appropriateness for all students, reasoned ambitiousness, and sources.

Why BP?

The teacher “adopts a broad goal” of “on average students will receive scaled score of 316 or higher on the CST,” the end-of-year state test.  This goal “aspires to be ambitious and feasible for the entire class,” as the teacher set this target by comparing past results on the exam of a high-performing school district and  his school, i.e., “Last year, students at my school averaged a scale score of 316.  I found the scores of the highest-performing school district in the state –ABC Unified in LA county—online at ap.org.  Their average score was 316 If my class averages a 316on the exam, that will mean that my students will have closed the achievement gap by 25% this year.” 

Why not AP?

Since the teacher has not administered a diagnostic and re-visited the goal based on students’ incoming skill levels, there is insufficient evidence that the goal is “both ambitious and feasible for most students…based on diagnostic results.”

Rating: BPStrand 2: The teacher’s understanding of how accomplishing goals will demonstrate mastery of standards and increase students’ opportunities in life.

Why BP?

The teacher “describes how the goal is aligned to key standards.”  He describes which standards the students need to master in order to achieve a 316 on the CST, and which can be de-prioritized. Specifically, “In order to ensure that my students will get a 316 on the exam, I’m going to emphasize some standards over others. I decided to focus on key concepts that will build students’ understanding of living things from the basic building blocks (macromolecules) to entire ecosystems.   If students master 80% of the content aligned to the key concepts, and get 80% of those questions correct on the CST, they will achieve a 316 on the exam.” 

The teacher has identified “a basic tool of measuring achievement,” that is, the CST and an additional end-of-year proxy exam: “Of course, we won’t know the official CST scores until August, but I plan to administer an exam similar to the CST (as prep for the CST) at the end of the year and calculate scaled scores on that exam.  Then, I’ll be able to tell the students whether or not we reached the big goal at the end of the year.”