Advanced proficiency level: 2nd Grade

This clip exemplifies this teacher’s classroom behavior management.

Support materials:

Video clip #273

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating: Four AP Strands equal an overall AP rating.

Novice

Beginning

Advanced

In action…
Demonstrates attempt to communicate instructions and directions and to respond to misbehaviors clearly and assertively

In reflection…
Accurately explains key strategies for communicating instructions and directions and for responding to misbehaviors clearly and assertively

Explains in a compelling way the importance of each strategy

Strand 1: The teacher’s communication of behavioral instructions.

Communicates expectations clearly and assertively, as necessary, sometimes avoiding in-depth discussions of expectations because they are reasonably established

Communicates expectations, and often the purpose behind them, clearly, assertively and confidently, as necessary, usually avoiding in-depth discussions of expectations because they are well established

Strand 2: The versatility and quality of a teacher’s response.

Effectively uses the same techniques to respond justly and similarly to comparable misbehaviors while maintaining students’ dignity

Effectively chooses from a range of techniques to respond justly and purposefully to misbehaviors while maintaining students’ dignity

Strand 3: The consistency and nuance with which the teacher responds to behavioral issues.

Often reacts to violations of classroom rules immediately, clearly, and assertively in the moment

Consistently reacts immediately, clearly and assertively in the moment

Strand 4: The summative effects of the teacher’s intervention.

Misbehaviors sometimes occur and often cease in the short-term with teacher’s intervention

Misbehavior rarely prevents the lesson from moving forward and consistently cease in the short-and long-term with teacher’s intervention


Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: AP Strand 1: The teacher’s communication of behavioral instructions.

Why AP?

The teacher "communicates expectations for behavior, and often the purpose behind them, clearly, assertively and as necessary." For example, when the students were lined up and waiting to go to "specials" the teacher very quickly reviewed some expectations and explained why they needed to move quickly with convincing poise and appropriate authority.

Why not E?

There is insufficient evidence that the teacher "almost always avoids discussions of expectations entirely because students have thoroughly internalized them."

Rating: AP Strand 2: The versatility and quality of a teacher’s response.

Why AP?

The teacher "effectively chooses from a range of techniques to respond justly and purposefully to misbehaviors while maintaining students' dignity." She uses the following techniques: classroom cash, conferences in the hall, notes home and a behavior chart. We can see that the teacher "maintains students' dignity" during the lesson when she asks the student for one dollar of classroom cash without publicly discussing the students' misbehavior more than necessary.

Why not E?

There is insufficient evidence that the teacher "effectively and appropriately discerns and addresses individual causes of misbehavior."

Rating: APStrand 3: The consistency and nuance with which the teacher responds to behavioral issues.

Why AP?

The teacher "consistently reacts immediately, clearly and assertively in the moment." We see her doing this while responding to both positive and negative behavior. For example, she immediately and clearly gives a reward to student who is in an active listening position, and immediately and clearly takes away classroom cash from a student who is misbehaving.

Why not E?

There is insufficient evidence that the teacher "always effectively considers individual students and situations when reacting in the moment."

Rating: E Strand 4: The summative effects of the teacher’s intervention.

Why E?

The teacher has empowered students to "resolve and/or prevent misbehavior by independently problem-solving and making good choices." For example, during a job interview, she asks a student to work things out on her own, and the student immediately leaves to do that. She also asks the applicant in the job interview when she's been a good friend, and follows up with the student who had the note sent home about her relationship with another student.