Beginning proficiency level: 10th Grade English Language Arts

Support materials:
Lesson Plan

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating: Three BP strands and one AP strand equals an over all BP rating.

Beginning

Advanced

Exemplary

Strand 1: The alignment of assessments with learning goals, and the degree to which assessments are scaffolded

Creates or obtains diagnostics that assess students' readiness, as well as formative (including lesson assessments) and summative assessments that measure each learning goal taught. Assessments contain no questions unrelated to the learning goals taught.

Creates or obtains diagnostics that assess the extent of readiness of most students, as well as formative assessments (including lesson assessments) that, when appropriate, scaffold questions to discern extent of mastery of each learning goal taught and summative assessments that measure mastery of each learning goal taught. Assessments do not contain any items unrelated to the learning goals taught.

Strand 2: The reliability of assessments, as indicated by the number and variation of assessment items aligned to the objectives being tested

Uses items (e.g., questions, rubric rows) aligned to the objectives being tested

Uses multiple items aligned to the same objective, in summative and, if appropriate, formative assessments (while also balancing the need for efficiency)

Uses multiple items in multiple modes, aligned to the same objective, in summative, and if appropriate, formative assessments (while balancing the need for efficiency)

Strand 3: The degree to which (and efficiency with which) assessments test students' genuine mastery of the objective

Ensures assessment reveals true mastery of the intended objectives

Ensures each item reveals true mastery (while balancing the need for efficiency)

Uses authentic assessments, when appropriate, to reveal true mastery (while balancing the need for efficiency)

Strand 4: The quality, reliability and efficiency of the grading systems.

Grading systems provide an accurate picture of student performance against goals to guide future planning, and the teacher can accurately articulate a vision of student mastery

Grading systems efficiently provide a detailed, increasingly reliable picture of student performance against goals to guide future planning, and the teacher can accurately articulate what explicit degrees of student mastery look like on items.

Grading systems are consistent and extremely efficient, provide a detailed, increasingly reliable picture of student performance against goals to guide future planning and the teacher can accurately articulate what explicit degrees of student mastery look like on individual items.


Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: BP Strand 1: The alignment of assessments with learning goals, and the degree to which assessments are scaffolded

Why BP?

According to the lesson plan, the objective to be taught/assessed,“Identify character development” refers to identifying details that reveal character. Character development does not necessarily include the more rigorous skill analyzing a character's change over time (which would be "dynamic development"). Each of the three items on the exit slip assesses whether the student can identify different aspects of character (personality, physical, mental), and no items are unrelated to the objective.

Why not AP?

The items are not “scaffolded”—in this case, the items to not build in complexity. For example, to correctly identify and describe a physical characteristic, the students need make inferences (the author does not directly tell the reader any physical characteristics). A student who knows what a physical character trait is, and could accurately identify it when it si directly stated by the author, may answer this item incorrectly because s/he has trouble making inferences, but the teacher would not know the root of misunderstanding on this item.

Rating: BP Strand 2: The reliability of assessments, as indicated by the number and variation of assessment items aligned to the objectives being tested

Why BP?

The assessment uses “items aligned to the objectives.” The assessment includes one item to assess mastery of each sub-objective (identifying physical, mental and personality traits).

Items are directly aligned to the objective

Why not AP?

This assessment does not use “multiple items.”

Rating: APStrand 3: The degree to which (and efficiency with which) assessments test students' genuine mastery of the objective

Why AP?

Each item reveals true mastery of the objective being assessed. The tenth-grade students should be able to identify character development in the eighth-grade level passage. While the students can guess whether each trait is “physical” “personality” or mental” with 33% accuracy, they are required to explain how they know this, therefore revealing their true mastery. The assessment is also reasonable in length, and therefore “efficient.”

Why not E?

The assessment does not include any tasks that “mimic real world application.”

Rating: BP Strand 4: The quality, reliability and efficiency of the grading systems.

Why BP?

The teacher’s grading system provides an “accurate picture of student performance.” The teacher has broken down the objective into three parts (personality, physical and mental traits), and two points are awarded for mastery of each objective. Grading the assessment will allow the teacher to determine the students’ mastery of each part. As demonstrated by the example, the teacher can “articulate a clear vision of student mastery.”

Why not AP?

There is insufficient evidence that the teacher can articulate “what explicit degrees of student mastery look like.”

Rating: I/EStrand 5: The specificity of information provided by the tracking system.

Why I/E?

There is no evidence that the teacher has created a tracking system. For lesson assessments, this is often the case. This will not count against the score for this rubric row.