Beginning proficiency level: 1st Grade General Assessments

In this example, an Evaluator and CM discuss assessments.

Support materials:
CM and Evaluator Transcript

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating: Three BP strands and two AP strands equal an overall BP rating (fifty percent or more of the strands would need to be AP for a BP+ rating).

Beginning

Advanced

Exemplary

Strand 1: The alignment of assessments with learning goals, and the degree to which assessments are scaffolded

Creates or obtains diagnostics that assess students' readiness, as well as formative (including lesson assessments) and summative assessments that measure each learning goal taught. Assessments contain no questions unrelated to the learning goals taught.

Creates or obtains diagnostics that assess the extent of readiness of most students, as well as formative assessments (including lesson assessments) that, when appropriate, scaffold questions to discern extent of mastery of each learning goal taught and summative assessments that measure mastery of each learning goal taught. Assessments do not contain any items unrelated to the learning goals taught.

Creates or obtains diagnostics that provide detailed information about the extent of readiness of each student, formative assessments (as well as lesson assessments) that, when appropriate, scaffold questions to discern the extent of mastery of each learning goal taught, and summative assessments that measure mastery of each learning goal taught, including components requiring higher-order thinking. Assessments contain no questions unrelated to the learning goals taught.

Strand 2: The reliability of assessments, as indicated by the number and variation of assessment items aligned to the objectives being tested

Uses items (e.g., questions, rubric rows) aligned to the objectives being tested

Uses multiple items aligned to the same objective, in summative and, if appropriate, formative assessments (while also balancing the need for efficiency)

Uses multiple items in multiple modes, aligned to the same objective, in summative, and if appropriate, formative assessments (while balancing the need for efficiency)

Strand 3: The degree to which (and efficiency with which) assessments test students' genuine mastery of the objective

Ensures assessment reveals true mastery of the intended objectives

Ensures each item reveals true mastery (while balancing the need for efficiency)

Uses authentic assessments, when appropriate, to reveal true mastery (while balancing the need for efficiency)

Strand 4: The quality, reliability and efficiency of the grading systems.

Grading systems provide an accurate picture of student performance against goals to guide future planning, and the teacher can accurately articulate a vision of student mastery

Grading systems efficiently provide a detailed, increasingly reliable picture of student performance against goals to guide future planning, and the teacher can accurately articulate what explicit degrees of student mastery look like on items.

Grading systems are consistent and extremely efficient, provide a detailed, increasingly reliable picture of student performance against goals to guide future planning and the teacher can accurately articulate what explicit degrees of student mastery look like on individual items.


Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: APStrand 1: The alignment of assessments with learning goals, and the degree to which assessments are scaffolded

Why AP?

The teacher is assessing one learning goal (SWBAT interpret bar graphs to identify quantities represented, as well as to compare quantities using the expressions "more," "fewer," "most," and "fewest," including by answering "how many more/how many fewer" questions) and includes an assessment that measures that key learning goal.


The objectives themselves are scaffolded, and since each objective has corresponding questions, the teacher is able to "discern extent of mastery" of the key learning goal.


There are no extraneous questions.

Why not E?

Although some of the questions ask students to analyze the graphs and explain their thinking, there are not "enough components requiring higher-order thinking" to constitute an E rating. The learning goal itself only asks students to "interpret," which limits their higher-order thinking.

Rating: BPStrand 2: The reliability of assessments, as indicated by the number and variation of assessment items aligned to the objectives being tested

Why BP?

The test questions are aligned to the objectives being tested, but the students only have one opportunity to demonstrate mastery of “identifying quantity”.

Why not AP?

Although the assessment does use "multiple items aligned to the same key objective to increase reliability" for some of the objectives (e.g. identifying quantity), there is only one question for identifying more and fewer.

Rating: APStrand 3: The degree to which (and efficiency with which) assessments test students' genuine mastery of the objective

Why AP?

The teacher "ensures assessment reveals true mastery of the intended objectives" because students are not likely to get answers correct unless they have truly mastered the content. Additionally, the teacher says she reads the test to two students, so there is no concern that students’ inability to read would hinder their ability demonstrate mastery on the intended objectives.


The test is efficient to complete and grade.

Why not E?

The assessment does not include performance assessments.

Rating: BPStrand 4: The quality, reliability and efficiency of the grading systems.

Why BP?

Although there is not explicit evidence about how the unit assessment will be graded, it is likely that each question is worth one point and the teacher will use the total number of points available to calculate the percentage grade. This system would "provide an accurate picture of student performance against goals."

Why not AP?

The grading system for summative assessments does not provide a "detailed" picture of student performance because the overall test grade does not reveal information about particular areas where students struggled.

Rating: BPStrand 5: The specificity of information provided by the tracking system.

Why BP?

The teacher describes a tracking system that only records "student performance on assessments."

Why not AP?

There is no evidence that the tracking system "calculates and reports individual and class progress toward big goals."