Advanced proficiency level: 1st Grade

Keisha is a first grade teacher (finishing her second year of teaching). Alice is a third grade teacher (finishing her first year of teaching). Manny is their PD. The three of them are meeting jointly to discuss Keisha's peer role model program. This conversation will be used as evidence for evaluating Keisha on I-3.

Support materials:
Conversation between PD and CMs

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating: Three AP ratings equal an overall AP rating.

Beginning

Advanced

Exemplary

Strand 1: The alignment between role models’ messages and the ideals of persistence and academic success.

Ensures that role model conveys message of persistence or academic success

Ensures that role model conveys message of persistence and academic success

Ensures that role model conveys messages of extraordinary persistence and academic success

Strand 2: The extent to which students are able to interact with role models and extract meaning and inspiration from their stories.

Enables students to learn role models' stories through occasional exposure

Enables students to gain frequent and meaningful exposure to role models

Generates opportunities for students to work directly with role models

Strand 3: The number of students who have relevant role models.

Uses reasonably appropriate and relevant role models with whom at least some students can identify

Ensures almost all students have appropriate role models with whom they identify, based on an understanding of student sub-groups

Monitors individual students and ensures all have effective role models with whom they deeply identify


Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: APStrand 1: The alignment between role models’ messages and the ideals of persistence and academic success.

Why AP?

  • Keisha's student role models convey messages of persistence and academic success. They talk specifically about the importance of first grade work, the importance of working hard in the first grade, and emphasize that mastering first grade skills take practice.
  • Keisha's student role models serve as inspiring models of success, who effectively "reinforce students’ belief that they can and want to succeed academically." The fifth graders clearly link their own hard work to their ongoing academic success.

Why not E?

The student role models do not convey messages of extraordinary persistence and academic success. They speak about very typical instances of hard work and achievement without exemplifying unique or particularly inspiring situations.

Rating: APStrand 2: The extent to which students are able to interact with role models and extract meaning and inspiration from their stories.

Why AP?

Keisha generates opportunities for her students to gain frequent and meaningful exposure to the peer role models. The fifth grade students make presentations to the first graders, conduct joint projects, read stories, recommend books, and eat with them occasionally. The first graders are given multiple opportunities to interact with the peer models and to learn of and be inspired by their successful behaviors.

Why not E?

To achieve an E rating, Keisha would need to enable her students to interact more directly with the role models. Although they do eat lunch together, this only occurs four or five times per year. All of the other interactions take place in whole-group settings as opposed to small group or individual relationships. By assigning individual mentors, who would meet one-on-one on a regular basis (as indeed, she indicates she is thinking of doing next year), Keisha would provide the direct interaction required for an E rating.

Rating: APStrand 3: The number of students who have relevant role models.

Why AP?

By using student mentors from the same school, Keisha ensures that the role models innately share certain characteristics with her students (like background, neighborhood, ethnicity, etc.), making their "big kid" successes seem particularly attainable to most of her students. Keisha also deliberately ensures that the fifth graders who read to her class represent both genders and a variety of personality types to appeal to different subgroups. Through the fifth grade book recommendations the peer role models likely reach a broad range of student interests.

Why not E?

Because Keisha has not yet assigned individual mentors, it is unlikely that every single student has a role model with whom he or she can deeply identify. In order to ensure ideal matches for every student's personality and interests, she would likely need to either specifically track which traits needed representing to her class, or work closely with Mrs. Chapman (and maybe even another fifth grade class) to personally match and select individual mentors that perfectly fit each of her students’ needs.