Novice proficiency level: 9th Grade Science

This example includes a unit plan, end-of-unit assessment, and an excerpt from the grade book.

 

Support materials:

Lesson Plan and Related Student Materials

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating: Four novice strands and one BP strand equal an overall Novice rating.

Novice

Beginning

Advanced

 

In action…
Demonstrates attempt to create or obtain standards-aligned diagnostic, formative, OR summative assessments (with tracking and grading systems) to determine where students are against big goals

In reflection…
Accurately explains the criteria to consider when creating or obtaining diagnostics and assessments, as well as how they are used to determine student progress toward big goals

Strand 1: The alignment of assessments with learning goals, and the degree to which assessments are scaffolded

Creates or obtains diagnostics that assess students' readiness, as well as formative (including lesson assessments) and summative assessments that measure each learning goal taught. Assessments contain no questions unrelated to the learning goals taught.

Creates or obtains diagnostics that assess the extent of readiness of most students, as well as formative assessments (including lesson assessments) that, when appropriate, scaffold questions to discern extent of mastery of each learning goal taught and summative assessments that measure mastery of each learning goal taught. Assessments do not contain any items unrelated to the learning goals taught.

Strand 2: The reliability of assessments, as indicated by the number and variation of assessment items aligned to the objectives being tested

Uses items (e.g., questions, rubric rows) aligned to the objectives being tested

Uses multiple items aligned to the same objective, in summative and, if appropriate, formative assessments (while also balancing the need for efficiency)

Strand 3: The degree to which (and efficiency with which) assessments test students' genuine mastery of the objective

Ensures assessment reveals true mastery of the intended objectives

Ensures each item reveals true mastery (while balancing the need for efficiency)

Strand 4: The quality, reliability and efficiency of the grading systems.

Grading systems provide an accurate picture of student performance against goals to guide future planning, and the teacher can accurately articulate a vision of student mastery

Grading systems efficiently provide a detailed, increasingly reliable picture of student performance against goals to guide future planning, and the teacher can accurately articulate what explicit degrees of student mastery look like on items.

Strand 5: The specificity of information provided by the tracking system.

Creates or obtains tracking system that records student performance on assessments

Creates or obtains tracking system that calculates and reports individual and class progress toward big goals

 

 

Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: NStrand 1: The alignment of assessments with learning goals, and the degree to which assessments are scaffolded

Why N?

The assessment does not cover some of the learning goals included in the unit plan. For example, students are not asked to demonstrate mastery related to standard 3c. Further, the unit assessment includes several questions that do not match back to objectives or standards. For example, several questions ask about “pure substances” (questions #11-16). Although pure substances relate to standard 3b, they are not explicitly included in the unit standards.

Rating: NStrand 2: The reliability of assessments, as indicated by the number and variation of assessment items aligned to the objectives being tested

Why N?

The test questions align to the objectives being assessed, but students are often given only one opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the objective (e.g. Students are asked to draw an element only once.)

Rating: NStrand 3: The degree to which (and efficiency with which) assessments test students' genuine mastery of the objective

Why N?

Several of the questions give students too much information to discern whether or not students have truly mastered the objectives. For example, the first question asks students to list the "three" parts of an atom. The next three questions then give the answer.

The word bank allows students to use the process of elimination to answer questions.

Question #18 includes an obviously wrong answer (i.e., “Hot Cheetos”), which allows students to guess between only three answer choices.

Rating: NStrand 4: The quality, reliability and efficiency of the grading systems.

Why N?

While we do see “grades” for the unit assessment in the tracking sheet, it is not clear how the teacher will “consistently evaluate” each student’s unit test. There is no obvious scale for each test item.

Rating: BP Strand 5: The specificity of information provided by the tracking system.

Why BP?

The tracking system "records student performance" on the unit assessments.

Why not AP?

The tracking system does not calculate and report "individual and class progress toward big goals" because the connection between the unit assessment and the big goal is unclear.