Advanced proficiency level: 1st Grade

The teacher interview occurs mid-year.

Support materials:

Classroom Observation Notes (Excerpt)

Teacher Interview (Excerpt)

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating: Two AP ratings equal an overall AP rating.

Beginning

Advanced

Exemplary

Strand 1: The teacher’s effectiveness in selecting “I want” strategies and messages that will compel students.

Effectively uses the same teacher-centered strategies in all situations to convey generic messages that students benefit from academic achievement

Effectively uses student-centered strategies (based on an understanding of students and depending on the situation) to reach a range of students to convey that students benefit from academic achievement

Effectively considers individual students and situations when choosing strategies and messages that convey that students benefit from academic achievement

Strand 2: The frequency of “I want” strategies and the degree to which they are integrated into the classroom.

Implements strategies in isolation and does so occasionally

Employs a series of integrated classroom strategies regularly

Monitors individual students’ “I will” investment levels, effectively conveys messages and employs strategies as often as necessary, enables students to empower one another, and initiates effective efforts to shape the larger school context.


Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: APStrand 1: The teacher’s effectiveness in selecting “I want” strategies and messages that will compel students.

Why AP?

  • The teacher "uses student-centered strategies (based on an understanding of students and depending on the situation) to reach a range of students to convey that students benefit from academic achievement."
  • These strategies include: a poster with students’ ideas about what they will need to learn for their future professions, a big buddy program where fourth graders encourage her students’ desire to learn, a program where students’ improve their reading so that they can read to pre-school children, reading students books about different professions and discussing how academic achievement will be necessary for students’ future occupations, assigning students to interview someone in their life about why math is important, and creating an in-class grocery store where students can practice the real-world applications of the math skills they are learning.
  • These strategies are student-centered because students actively participate in all of them. They are also implemented "depending on the situation" because they are differentiated and tailored to build students’ “I want” investment in each subject the teacher teaches.
  • The teacher implements the strategies “effectively” so that almost all students believe that they will benefit from academic achievement as evidenced by the interviewer's observation that students are deeply invested as well as the teacher’s account of how influential the fourth grade students have been in encouraging her students’ desire to learn and how the math strategies have motivated students by showing them all the real-world applications of math.

Why not E?

  • There is insufficient evidence that the teacher "effectively considers individual students and situations when choosing strategies and messages." Although the teacher has a wide-range of strategies, the strategies are all implemented whole-class and there is no evidence that she has created strategies to target the motivation of specific students.

Rating: APStrand 2: The frequency of “I want” strategies and the degree to which they are integrated into the classroom.

Why AP?

The teacher "regularly conveys messages and employs a series of integrated classroom strategies." Strategies to build students "I want investment occur frequently. Every week, a fourth grader visits the teachers' class to read to students and encourage their “I want” investment and once a month, students work individually with their fourth grade buddy. The teacher also "frequently" discusses with students what they want to be when they grow up, reads books about different occupations weekly, and has students fill out sheets connecting academic achievement to occupations they desire once a month. Finally, once a week she has a student make a presentation on how someone in their life uses math skills and she frequently lets students go to the grocery store math center where they are able to apply their math skills in a mock real-world setting. Therefore, the teachers' investment strategies occur multiple times every week and are tied to existing structures that are well integrated into the classroom routines.

Why not E?

There is no evidence that the teacher "monitors individual students’ “I want” investment levels, effectively conveys messages and employs strategies as often as necessary." For the most part, the teacher’s strategies appear to be implemented according to a pre-set schedule and not in response to the momentary investment needs of individual students. In addition, there is no evidence that the teacher "enables students to empower one another, and initiates effective efforts to shape the larger school context."