Advanced proficiency level: 8th Grade English

Support materials:
Video clip #181

Classroom Observation Notes (Excerpt)

Conversation with Evaluator (Excerpt)

Student Interviews (Excerpt)

Audio clip #181b_ward

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating: Two AP ratings equal an overall AP rating.

Beginning

Advanced

Exemplary

Strand 1: The teacher’s effectiveness in selecting “I want” strategies and messages that will compel students.

Effectively uses the same teacher-centered strategies in all situations to convey generic messages that students benefit from academic achievement

Effectively uses student-centered strategies (based on an understanding of students and depending on the situation) to reach a range of students to convey that students benefit from academic achievement

Effectively considers individual students and situations when choosing strategies and messages that convey that students benefit from academic achievement

Strand 2: The frequency of “I want” strategies and the degree to which they are integrated into the classroom.

Implements strategies in isolation and does so occasionally

Employs a series of integrated classroom strategies regularly

Monitors individual students’ “I will” investment levels, effectively conveys messages and employs strategies as often as necessary, enables students to empower one another, and initiates effective efforts to shape the larger school context.


Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: APStrand 1: The teacher’s effectiveness in selecting “I want” strategies and messages that will compel students.

Why AP?

  • The teacher "effectively uses student-centered strategies (based on an understanding of students and depending on the situation) to reach a range of students to convey that students benefit from achievement."
  • For example, each month, the teacher assigns a group of four students to select occupations, research the relevance of reading to the occupations, and make a presentation to the class. The teacher also encourages students to add book, magazine, and newspaper articles recommendations to the bulletin board. The teacher individually conferences with students about their books. Finally, the teacher responds to letters they've written about their books in their journals. These four strategies are student-centered because students actively participate in the strategies.
  • In addition, students’ comments in the video and context indicate that the teacher has implemented her strategies “effectively” so that almost all students believe achieving academically will benefit them (e.g., "Well, no matter what job you have you have to read. Even if you're something like a mechanic-which is what I want to be-you still have to read to order the car parts, and you have to read reviews about the different parts, and you have to be able to read to make bills to charge your customers. So you no matter what you gotta know how to read." And "I haven't always liked to read. I used to think that it was boring. But then here I found a whole lot of books that I like to read. I found out that I like to read mystery books so now I like to read more. Last year, I thought I didn't like to read because I used to always pick the wrong books.").
  • The teacher also describes how effective she's been in investing her students in reading, "I have kids who have read ten books already and it's only October 4th. The sheer number of kids who are plowing through books-and meaningfully because we do write letters back and forth-as part of the homework. I'm impressed with the amount they're reading. It's good that they're hooked on reading and they're always talking about it; they're always excited about it. I have a lot of kids that read under their desks, which is not ideal, it's not what I'm going for, but it does make me smile that they love it so much. So I do think we're doing better on loving reading."

Why not E?

  • Although the teacher does work with individual students by conferencing with them, responding to their journals, and helping them select books, there is insufficient evidence that she chooses strategies or messages for individual students. For the most part, the teacher implements the same set of strategies for the entire class regardless of students’ unique circumstances or individual motivational needs.

Rating: APStrand 2: The frequency of “I want” strategies and the degree to which they are integrated into the classroom.

Why AP?

  • The teacher "regularly conveys messages and employs a series of integrated classroom strategies." Each month, a different group of students presents information about the importance of reading to various occupations. Further, students are continuously updating the bulletin board with recommendations. The video shows the teacher frequently conferring with students and she states that she regularly responds to their reading journals.