Beginning proficiency level: 10th Grade Chemistry

 

1. Carl is teaching a lesson on the achievement gap. The video begins mid-way through his lesson as he finishes presenting a bar graph that depicts a comparison of standardized assessment scores between Howard County (a suburban school district) and Baltimore City (his inner-city district). When he refers to ?20? and ?80,? he is referring to the fact that Baltimore City students scored in the 20th percentile on the standardized math exam, while Howard County students performed in the 80th percentile.
2. The Observation Notes pick up where the video ends and summarize the remainder of Carl's lesson.

Support materials:

Video clip #174

Observation Notes (Excerpt)
Conversation with Evaluator (Excerpt)

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating: Two BP ratings equal an overall BP rating.

Novice

Beginning

Advanced

Strand 1: The teacher’s effectiveness in selecting “I want” strategies and messages that will compel students.

Effectively uses the same teacher-centered strategies in all situations to convey generic messages that students benefit from academic achievement

Effectively uses student-centered strategies (based on an understanding of students and depending on the situation) to reach a range of students to convey that students benefit from academic achievement

Effectively considers individual students and situations when choosing strategies and messages that convey that students benefit from academic achievement

Strand 2: The frequency of “I want” strategies and the degree to which they are integrated into the classroom.

Implements strategies in isolation and does so occasionally

Employs a series of integrated classroom strategies regularly

Monitors individual students’ “I will” investment levels, effectively conveys messages and employs strategies as often as necessary, enables students to empower one another, and initiates effective efforts to shape the larger school context.

 

Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: BPStrand 1: The teacher’s effectiveness in selecting “I want” strategies and messages that will compel students.

Why BP?

The teacher "effectively uses the same teacher-centered strategies in all situations to convey generic messages that students benefit from academic achievement." In the video clip, the teacher shows students achievement data from their district and a suburban district and talks to students about the college, job, and life prospects of students in the 20th percentile vs. students in the 80th percentile. In addition, the context reveals that the teacher also gives students statistics about the benefits of college and reads an essay called "Why I Love College" during his presentation. The context also says that the teacher employs a second strategy of hanging a poster listing the life applications of chemistry. Both strategies are "teacher-centered" as the teacher drives the strategies and there is little student involvement.

In addition, from observing the teacher’s presentation and students’ occasional participation (e.g., one student calls out and says he wants to be in the 90th percentile during the PowerPoint presentation) it is likely that the teacher is implementing the strategies "effectively," so that at least half of students would find the teacher’s message important, relevant, and compelling.

Why not AP?

The teacher’s strategies are "teacher-centered" and not "student-centered" as they involve little student participation.

Rating: BPStrand 2: The frequency of “I want” strategies and the degree to which they are integrated into the classroom.

Why BP?

The teacher "conveys messages and implements strategies occasionally and in isolation." The context reveals that the teacher plans to return to the idea that students want to close the achievement gap with the suburban district after each unit (i.e., "Before and after each unit I think I'm going to return to this theme of the achievement gap. I'll check their progress before and after and as they have demonstrable progress, I'll be sure to make it very exciting-like, 'See, we're closing that gap! We're catching up to those county kids!").

Why not AP?

The teacher’s plan to implement one strategy at the end of each unit is insufficiently frequent and inadequately tied to classroom structures to meet the AP bar for conveying messages "regularly" and employing a series of "integrated classroom strategies."