Novice proficiency level: 9th Grade Algebra

Support materials:

Conversation with Evaluator (Excerpt)

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating:Two N ratings equal an overall N rating.

Novice

Beginning

Advanced

In action… Demonstrates attempt to develop students’ rational understanding that they will benefit from achievement

In reflection… Accurately explains key strategies for developing students’ rational understanding that they will benefit from achievement

Describes in a compelling way why it is important to develop students’ belief that they will benefit from achievement

Strand 1: The teacher’s effectiveness in selecting “I want” strategies and messages that will compel students.

Effectively uses the same teacher-centered strategies in all situations to convey generic messages that students benefit from academic achievement

Effectively uses student-centered strategies (based on an understanding of students and depending on the situation) to reach a range of students to convey that students benefit from academic achievement

Strand 2: The frequency of “I want” strategies and the degree to which they are integrated into the classroom.

Implements strategies in isolation and does so occasionally

Employs a series of integrated classroom strategies regularly


Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: NStrand 1: The teacher’s effectiveness in selecting “I want” strategies and messages that will compel students.

Why N?

  • The teacher attempts to "convey generic messages that students benefit from academic achievement." In the conversation with the evaluator, he explains the purpose of his lesson: "I wanted them to be excited about learning math. I wanted them to realize how important math is and and why it will matter for their whole lives."
  • However, he does not implement this strategy "effectively." His explanation of why math is important is difficult to follow because of several tangents (e.g., "Even though Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, he wasn't the only one who ever knew how to make it. He did actually file a patent, which is a way of saying, 'This is what I invented. This is my idea and no one else's.' Initially, it gives you exclusive right to make the product, but it's also an explicit explanation of what that product is." and "The people who voted-and you'll be some of those people before long. The people who joined together to say, 'This is what we believe as a society'-well, they said a lot of different things: 'You shouldn't kill anybody, you shouldn't do this, you should pay taxes-they say all of you should learn algebra.") It is unlikely that at least half the students, if theoretically asked, would find the teacher’s messages important, relevant, and compelling. Several students have their heads down, and very few students respond to his questions. Further, when the teacher tries to compel students by saying the state thinks the test is important and is therefore likely to add another one for geometry, a student replies, "We'll be out of school by then," indicating a lack investment in the teacher’s line of argument.

Rating: NStrand 2: The frequency of “I want” strategies and the degree to which they are integrated into the classroom.

Why N?

  • The conversation with the evaluator indicates that the teacher only has plans to implement his strategy once (i.e., I really just wanted to say it in the beginning of the year. I think now that I've said it, and they've heard it, we can just start focusing on learning math."). He has not met the BP bar of implementing strategies "occasionally."
  • Additional Note: If the evaluator returns later in the school year and the teacher has not implemented any additional strategies, the rating would then be PN because the teacher would no longer even be attempting to implement "I want" investment strategies.