Advanced proficiency level: 8th Grade Math

Support materials:
Video clip #161

Excerpt from Conversation with Evaluator

Excerpt from Conversation with Students (Two Months Later)

Overall rating & analysis

Overall rating: Two AP Strands equal an overall AP rating.

Beginning

Advanced

Exemplary

Strand 1: The teacher’s effectiveness in selecting “I can” strategies and messages that will compel students.

Effectively uses the same teacher-centered strategies in all situations to convey generic messages that students can achieve by working hard

Effectively uses student-centered strategies (based on an understanding of students and depending on the situation) to reach a range of students to convey that students can achieve by working hard

Effectively considers individual students and situations when choosing strategies and messages that convey that students can achieve by working hard

Strand 2: The frequency of “I can” strategies and the degree to which they are integrated into the classroom

Conveys messages and implements strategies occasionally and in isolation

Regularly conveys messages and employs a series of integrated classroom strategies

Monitors individual students’ “I can” investment levels, effectively conveys messages and employs strategies as often as necessary, enables students to empower one another, and initiates effective efforts to shape the larger school context


Analysis: Why did the teacher receive these ratings?

Rating: APStrand 1: The teacher’s effectiveness in selecting “I can” strategies and messages that will compel students.

Why AP

The teacher “effectively uses student-centered strategies (based on an understanding of students and depending on the situation) to reach a range of students to convey that students can achieve by working hard.”

In the video clip, the teacher is using the “student-centered strategy” of having students graph their proficiency on each objective, reflect on what they did that made them successful on some objectives and not others (i.e., studying more or working harder), and predict how they will do on the final exam and why. The strategy is “student-centered” because it features active student participation. During this time, the teacher also discusses results with students and ensures that they are making connections between hard work and academic achievement (e.g., “What do you think Cesar?” Cesar: “I have to work a lot more.” Jessica: “This one was good right? I like that you said that you have to work a lot more though because this one you must have done a lot of studying for. This is the one we took in Saturday school, without studying.”) Students’ comments during these discussions and in the context are an indication that the teacher is effective as students can apply what their persistence means in the class and find the messages important, relevant and compelling (e.g., “Well, they kind of show me how I’m doing. I mean, if I’m already proficient in a couple areas, then I know I can be in all of them if I work hard enough.”).

The context reveals that the teacher has two other “student-centered strategies,” including a “More Work=Higher Scores” bulletin board where students write their names each week if they’ve improved 10% on a quiz (after telling the class what work they did), and setting goals with her tutoring session students while giving students scaffolded assignments so that each week they are able to see academic success from their hard work. Both of these strategies are “student-centered” as they include active student participation.

Why not E?

Although the strategies help students make connections between their individual experience and the broader message that hard work will lead to academic achievement, there is no evidence that the teacher “considers individual students and situations when choosing strategies and messages.”

Rating: APStrand 2: The frequency of “I can” strategies and the degree to which they are integrated into the classroom.

Why AP?

The teacher “regularly conveys messages and employs a series of integrated classroom strategies.” She has students examine their grade strips every few weeks, students get recognized on the “More Work=Higher Scores” board and explain to the class what work they did that made them improve every week, and her tutoring students set weekly goals. These strategies are a purposeful part of classroom structures and students make the connection between their hard work and achievement at least once a week.