Evaluate and keep track of students’ performance [E-6]

Assess with strategic frequency

  • Give ongoing assessments to gauge student progress
  • Give students extra opportunities to show mastery, if necessary
  • read more

Grade promptly and provide clear feedback

  • Ensure that students know why they have or have not mastered objectives
  • read more

Track mastery of objectives

  • Record results promptly so that the data can inform your short and long-term planning
  • read more

Illustrations are grouped by the proficiency that they best bring to life.

We would like to communicate our deep appreciation to these teachers who are allowing us to learn from their experiences.

Explanation

Grading and tracking might feel time-consuming and tedious for us because we don’t know a quick, efficient way to do it, or because we think we need to grade and track every assignment and don’t know how to prioritize our time in grading and tracking the most important assignments.

Solution

First, make sure your grading and tracking system are clear and easy to use. If they aren’t efficient, view examples of effective grading and tracking systems and adapt them to fit your needs. To make tracking and grading more manageable, visit the tracking page and the grading page to read and hear tips. Also, remember that not all assignments should require the same amount of time and energy to grade and track. Consider spending more time grading and tracking the larger, more important assessments (e.g. diagnostic and summative assessments) while developing quicker ways to evaluate the smaller, formative assessments.

Explanation

Sometimes we don’t make tracking a priority because we are really busy and don’t see how it’s important given all the other demands of teaching. This leads us to put off recording student mastery data or neglect it altogether, preventing us from being able to clearly understand where students are academically and what they need in order to improve.

Solution

Read about the importance of tracking student data and hear a teacher discuss how tracking has benefited her classroom by visiting the “Why does this matter?” section of the E-6 main page. If you understand the importance of tracking but de-prioritize it because it’s too time-consuming, read below for help in making the process more efficient.

Explanation

Sometimes we don’t use student data because (a) we’re not really sure how to analyze data or use it to help our instruction, or (b) we may think the data is just for our school or district, not realizing the true importance of this information.

Solution

First, review the importance of gathering student data to understand the benefits of grading and tracking student results. If you understand what data can do for your classroom but simply don’t understand how to utilize it, read about how to analyze student performance and tailor your instructional choices to address your students’ needs.