Possible reasons for this:

  • I don’t have a clear and comprehensive vision of what my students should know, understand or be able to do when they leave my class at the end of the year.

    This is your underlying reason if:

    • If a friend were to ask me, "What is your goal for your students this year?" I would have a hard time immediately responding with a compelling answer that he or she would understand.
    • If a friend were to ask me, "What are the five or ten most important things your students need to know, understand, or be able to do at the end of the year?" I wouldn't be sure how to answer.
  • I have not mapped out an instructional plan that covers the entire year, unit-by-unit.

    This is your underlying reason if:

    • If a friend were to ask me to chronologically describe what my students will be learning this year—and to explain my reasoning behind that chronology—I would be unsure what to say in some spots.
    • If a student were to ask me, “How does what we’re doing today fit into everything else we’re doing this year?” I might have a difficult time responding.
    • As I near the end of a unit, I’m unsure what unit to teach next.
    • I sometimes find myself at night figuring out what to teach the next day.
  • I'm not sure I really know what student mastery of our learning goals looks like.

    This is your underlying reason if:

    • If someone were to ask me to show them what students should be doing to demonstrate mastery of the learning goals, I wouldn't immediately be able to do this.
    • I have not yet chosen or developed my end-of-year assessment.

What you can do